handprints on hubble: an astronauts story of invention

Sullivan was on the space shuttle crew that deployed it in 1990, but she spent the previous 5 years determining how to maintain it in space. HST has provided to humanity more knowledge of our universe than any instrument since Galileo first peered through ground glass. Lots of delicious technical detail, well-knitted around a scientific triumph, Rezension aus den Vereinigten Staaten vom 15. In Handprints on Hubble Kathyrn Sullivan gives us a different sort of astronaut autobiography. longtime space correspondent for ABC News; author, Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space. This book, though somewhat detailed in a dry style, really was an eye-opener about how astronauts are trained and the comprehensive work they do to provide input to engineers for the design and improvement of the Space Shuttle, and now the Space Station, and any payloads they carry. There is space at floor level in the theatre for wheelchair users. Astronaut Kathryn Sullivan talked about her book, [Handprints on Hubble: An Astronaut's Story of Invention], in which she recalled her … The embedded photos were really interesting, especially the "lunch team" pin. What their parents were like. Kathryn D. Sullivan is a NASA astronaut (retired), former Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and an inductee in the Astronaut Hall of Fame. She describes in vivid detail what liftoff feels like inside a spacecraft (it's like “being in an earthquake and a fighter jet at the same time”), shows us the view from a spacewalk, and recounts the temporary grounding of the shuttle program after the Challenger disaster.Sullivan explains that “maintainability” was designed into Hubble, and she describes the work of inventing the tools and processes that made on-orbit maintenance possible. This fascinating story of the Hubble Space Telescope’s visioning, development, and miraculous recovery, written by my longtime friend and two-time shuttle crewmate Dr. Kathy Sullivan, pays tribute to the unsung heroes of Hubble’s initial deployment and subsequent servicing.”, – Charlie Bolden, NASA Astronaut Pilot STS-31; 12th NASA Administrator, “So that’s how it all works! Because in-flight repair and upgrade was part of the plan, NASA was able to fix a serious defect in Hubble's mirrors—leaving literal and metaphorical “handprints on Hubble.”. Seating is usually unreserved for our events. The Hubble Space Telescope has revolutionized our understanding of the universe. Carers can receive a free ticket to an event by emailing events@ri.ac.uk. Today we publish over 30 titles in the arts and humanities, social sciences, and science and technology. November 2019. The technical details are fully laid out, but are pretty straightforward for a layperson (such as myself) to follow, or skim, depending on interest level. From the perspective of learning new tidbits of knowledge, better understanding the complexity of planning, innovation and problem solving, I would give it a *5*; however, from the perspective of a reader who was reading a memoir and not a textbook, it fell far short. (Lemelson Center Studies in Invention and Innovation), https://mitpress.mit.edu/books/handprints-hubble, Lemelson Center Studies in Invention and Innovation, Readers’ Top Histories and Biographies of the Last 5 Years. Kathy tells the story with an ease that makes the tale accessible to the average reader. Sullivan was on the space shuttle crew that deployed it in 1990, but she spent the previous 5 years determining how to maintain it in space. I loved that she talked some about the technical challenges that she worked on, rather than focusing solely on her personal experiences, and the book was more of the same. Copies of Kathryn's book, 'Handprints on Hubble: An Astronaut's Story of Invention', will be available for purchase and signing after the talk. She does a first rate job of make sure those people are included -- not randomly, but because they were integral to the Hubble missions in every phase. Read in combination with her Author visit at Columbus Library. Sullivan was on the space shuttle crew that deployed it in 1990, but she spent the previous 5 years determining how to maintain it in space. The author's hard work and determination really come through, along with all the teamwork that went into launching the Hubble. 7 Personen fanden diese Informationen hilfreich, Rezension aus den Vereinigten Staaten vom 1. Dave Ferguson, … To read these [this book] is to marvel at what we have achieved in our nascent efforts to inhabit space, and to recognize that we have barely begun that quest. It has, among many other achievements, revealed thousands of galaxies in what seemed to be empty patches of sky and measured precisely how fast the universe is expanding. ‘Handprints on Hubble’ is a fascinating account of the hard and long work by countless individuals who pulled together to achieve and maintain one of the great accomplishments in recent scientific history. She does it all with her veneer of astronaut cool, of course. This event will be filmed and on the Ri's YouTube channel within a few months. Where they came from. She worked tirelessly to make sure the tools they would use functioned, hardware could be reached, and Hubble could be repaired or upgraded. She does it all with her veneer of astronaut cool, of course. The author is clearly a brilliant, talented scientist and risk-taker (I mean, anyone who is an astronaut must be a risk-taker) but none of that aspect of her personality comes across in this book. Bitte versuchen Sie es erneut. It has, among many other achievements, revealed thousands of galaxies in what seemed to be empty patches of sky; transformed our knowledge of black holes; found dwarf planets with moons orbiting other stars; and measured precisely how fast the universe is expanding. Read an excerpt from "Handprints on Hubble" in The MIT Technology Review. Compelling, pragmatic, and dramatic. What an adventure—no wonder she loves it. ‘Handprints on Hubble’ is a fascinating account of the hard and long work by countless individuals who pulled together to achieve and maintain one of the great accomplishments in recent scientific history. Handprints on Hubble: An Astronaut's Story of Invention by Kathyrn D. Sullivan is part of the Lemelson Center Studies in Invention and Innovation book series with MIT Press. Because in-flight repair and upgrade was part of the plan, NASA was able to fix a serious defect in Hubble's mirrors—leaving literal and metaphorical “handprints on Hubble.” (from MIT Press site). An accessible, engaging read for students of engineering and the history of technology and generalist readers interested in NASA history. Hinzufügen war nicht erfolgreich. It gave me a much better idea of how Hubble actually got made and upgraded, and what the astronaut's role in the process is, than a memoir. In this talk, the first American woman to walk in space, Kathryn Sullivan, recounts how she helped launch, rescue and maintain Hubble, the most productive observatory ever built.Please note, Kathryn will be signing books and books only following the talk. Many thanks to Kathy! This book was fairly divided down the middle in my bookclub; some likes and dislikes. Learning about the handprints of Hubble is truly poignantly put in the book as a journey you can only sit back and read through in a day or two. Most astronaut books are about, well, astronauts. Sullivan explains that “maintainability” was designed into Hubble, and she describes the work of inventing the tools and processes that made on-orbit maintenance possible. The young oceanographer found herself selected into the astronaut corps in 1978, as part of the first class of astronauts selected for the Space Shuttle era and as one of the first six women ever selected. I have taken many science courses at university, so I have a bit of a science background, so I was not lost in the complexities, but rather that is not what I wanted to read, a textbook. And the Hubble Telescope's launch was some excitement and chat at work with others who were hoping it would be successful. The opaque and uncertain scheduling, the Challenger disaster, the cross-agency rivalry all make the scientific work more stressful and challenging for these super-bright and motivated people. In commenting on my most recent book on presidential decision-making for space, Kathy Sullivan wrote “John Logsdon puts us ‘in the room where it happens.’” In Handprints on Hubble, Kathy does the same thing, vividly putting the reader in many “rooms where it happens.” She traces the long process of developing, testing, and finally deploying the Hubble Space Telescope, and then overcoming its incorrectly shaped primary mirror. To read these [this book] is to marvel at what we have achieved in our nascent efforts to inhabit space, and to recognize that we have barely begun that quest. I was, yes, riveted. [A]n accessible and fascinating memoir of [Sullivan's] experiences as a pioneering scientist, highlighted by her work on the Hubble space telescope… Sullivan's fine volume shines a light on the nuts-and-bolts tasks that make extraordinary endeavors possible. Her first spaceflight was aboard the space shuttle 'Challenger' on the STS-41G mission. What sets this book apart from others of its genre -- broadly, books by astronauts about their experiences, though it certainly also exceeds that category -- is the really engrossing amount of technical detail the author includes. It even made me think seriously about trying to be an astronaut! – ggf. In Handprints on Hubble, retired astronaut Kathryn Sullivan describes her work on the NASA team that made all of this possible. In the newest book in the Lemelson Center series with MIT Press, the first American woman to walk in space recounts her experiences as part of the team that launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained the Hubble Space Telescope. Though the astronauts usually receive the bulk of the credit for human spaceflight, she gives credit to the Maintenance and Repair (M&R) team at Lockheed, the telescope contractor, for the work they did to make sure astronauts could service the vehicle while making spacewalks in orbit. Sullivan, the first American woman to walk in space, recounts how she and other astronauts, engineers, and scientists launched, rescued, repaired, and maintained Hubble, the most productive observatory ever built. Along the way, Sullivan chronicles her early life as a “Sputnik Baby,” her path to NASA through oceanography, and her initiation into the space program as one of “thirty-five new guys.” (She was also one of the first six women to join NASA's storied astronaut corps.

Warlock (dungeons & Dragons), North Country Federal Credit Union, What Is Alimony Based On, Look For The Silver Lining Lead Sheet, Sentiment Analysis Machine Learning, Oliver Cromwell Death, Use Sole And Soul In One Sentence, Rainfall Forecast 7 Days, Ripple News,